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Marvel at photographic explorations of industrial and scientific research spaces through Thomas Struth: Nature & Politics, only at the St. Louis Art Museum.

This exhibition is one of three technological displays coming to the museum and will be open for viewing until January 22. Admission is $12 for adults, $10 for seniors and students, $6 for children ages 6-12, and free for members.

The featured photos come from Struth’s visits to Europe, America, Asia, and the Middle East, providing a glimpse into spaces rarely seen by the public such as aeronautical centers, robotics labs, and nuclear fusion facilities.  Struth wanted to examine how humanity harnesses nature for technological and engineering advances.

This particular exhibition intersperses these subjects with recent works, including photographs of Disneyland, Isreal, and the West Bank. Through this juxtaposition, Struth questions the relationships between nature and humanity in such a materialistic world.

thomas struth

“Space Shuttle 1, Kennedy Space Center, Cape Canaveral 2008” (Courtesy of St. Louis Art Museum press release)

German photographer Thomas Struth is widely regarded as one of the most influential artists in modern photography, according to Culture Trip. He began as a painter, studying at the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf from 1973 to 1980, enrolling in a new photography class there at the behest of professor Gerhard Richter. He began by photographing architecture in the city, but grew to use photos to explore interdisciplinary subjects in inventive ways over time.

His focus on science, technology, and imagination blossomed after his trips to the DSME shipyard in South Korea, going on to document the Kennedy Space Center and centers for technology and research in Germany, Greece, and many other countries. Technological innovation is deeply intriguing to Struth, which is immediately clear in his current works.

Have you visited this exhibition? What discussions did it spark? Let us know in the comments below.

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